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April 13, 2016 / philosophermouseofthehedge

Fracture and repeat. Fractals, you.

From sleeping under the moon to always on zoom, each generation wails about the complexity of “modern” life and glorifies simple life of the past, the “Good Old Days”.

Couple on motorcycle.1977 Bionic Woman.(Lindsay Wagner and Evel Knievel) NBC.(USPD.pub.date/Commons.wikimedia.org

“Hang on like bionic babe.”(1977 “Bionic Woman” NBC/USPD/Commons.wikimedia.org)

Kinda like observations on the developmental phases of a growing child.

Every stage means problems – to which everyone says “Don’t worry. It’s a phase. They’ll grow out of it”.

Neglecting to tell you that each phase brings its’ own set of problems.

(Oh, and you just thought it would be easier when they could walk instead of being carried. Then, ride a bike or skateboard. If only they could drive themselves….)

Couple on horse with woman riding riding pillion. Project Gutenberg.(Gibey) "Horses: Past and Present".(Close of 19th century.)

Hang on. Tighter. It’s fine since you’re riding pillion.(PD/Project Gutenberg/Close of 19th century.)

Cradle to grave, it doesn’t stop. A pattern in repetition.

If that doesn’t fracture your thinking, nothing does.

Know about fractals?

Never ending patterns. Identical on different scales. Repeating over and over like a loop in various sizes.

Not just geometry or math or art or trees with leaves or galaxies or hurricanes or coastlines or blood and lung vascular systems or circadian rhythms or computer graphics….

Fractals permeate the natural world, as well as, the human ones.

couple on horse. 1840-1888.Centra Asia. (Aleksandr Kun /USPD.pub.date, reprod of PD image/Commons.wikimedia.org)

“Hang on, woman. You’re mine. They can’t criticize.” (1840-80.Central Asia/ Alexandra  Kun/ USPD/Commons.wikimedia.org)

Since nature is heavy with fractals, could human behavior also be a type of fractal?

Basic child development repeats individual after individual: generation after generation

Rural community turns into town, then city, to metroplex following a pattern

Societies and civilizations rise and fall. Predictably.

“History repeats itself. Historians repeat each other.” (1880Max Beerbohm)

Flintstone caveman set. Fred, Wilma, Pebbles Flintstone at Ankara.(Nevit Dilmen/Commons.wikimedia.org)

Ah, the joys of a simple life. (Fred, Wilma, Pebbles Flintstone’s happy home at Ankara./Nevit Dilmen/Commons.wikimedia.org)

A frenzy of fractal fever!

Fractal or fractured?

Small fissure in time.

Simply a figment of the imagination.

Mother and child.1913."Ah, my beautiful mansion" Gazette du Bon Ton No6 (USPD.pub.date/Commons.wikimedia.org)

1913.Simply a happy family.”Ah, my beautiful mansion”(USPD/Commons.wikimedia.org)

It is what it is, to repeat a thought.

Phil the Philosopher Mouse of the Hedge.

This post fractured from Larissa Thompson’s take on the Daily Post Photo Challenge “The Future” …so it’s a bit of a fractal or not?

Simpson family at home by their couch.. (Gabriel Sheppard/Commons.wikimedia.org)

North, South, East, West: happy home is simply best.(Gabriel Sheppard/Commons.wikimedia.org)

Frantic for fractals? Once you see them, the world never looks the same.

woman with plant. International Space station. Anousheh Ansari with plant grown in Zvezda Serv. Module.(NASA.spaceflight.nasa.gov/USPD/Commons.wikimedia.org)

The simple life forced? Back to basics: veggies in outer space.Happily home at the International Space Station: Anousheh Ansari and plant which happens to show fractals. (NASA/USPD/Commons.wikimedia.org)

 

 

 

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27 Comments

  1. easyweimaraner / Apr 13 2016 7:07 am

    I miss the good old days too… specially my biker-girl days… I still have the burn marks of the exhaust on my legs … maybe that means the good old days are etched on my mind and my legs?

    Like

    • philosophermouseofthehedge / Apr 13 2016 9:00 am

      I have a foot rest from one we put into a ditch once (I stepped off realizing it didn’t look like it was going well…up a steep incline after a few St. Thomas’ pina coladas). Yes, warm memories get burned into the brain and appendages. Thanks for driving that memory this way

      Like

  2. shoreacres / Apr 13 2016 7:17 am

    That Beerbohm quotation is the best. I just added a comment over at my place about music and literature critics, and his saying easily could be amended to apply to them, too.

    Like

    • philosophermouseofthehedge / Apr 13 2016 8:56 am

      That quote is really what caught my fractured attention…human fractal behavior said outright. (MAybe I’m onto a new “thing”…next comes book, talks shows, and speaking engagements…HA HA). Will wander your way shortly – (if it’s not going to storm, the dog is looking anxious about delayed walk…pea sized hail early this morning…best find a helmet for strolling?) Thanks for changing the tune!

      Like

  3. Paul / Apr 13 2016 7:44 am

    Ahhh fractals,one of my most favorite topics. Although it has fallen from favor, still I love “Ontogeny recapitulates Phylogeny.” – the concept that the development of the fetus in the womb reflects the same stages as the evolution of the phylum. Like you say everything from DNA to galaxies show characteristic of fractals. I’m drooling thinking about it. Such order.

    Liked by 1 person

    • philosophermouseofthehedge / Apr 13 2016 8:51 am

      That’s just a perfect response. Math, art, and nature are so close. With the way humans behavior appears cyclic, either we as a species are totally stupid, caught in an endless loop not of our making, or there’s some psychic fractal going on? (Oh, really? So you stopped at the first one…HAHA) Thanks for that image – needed that. (and so where are you posting now?…Paul, the wandering blogger)

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Sue / Apr 13 2016 10:06 am

    Always love reading where your mind takes you…..

    Like

    • philosophermouseofthehedge / Apr 13 2016 10:26 am

      Sometimes it’s a picture, sometimes a quote, sometimes people present something that just can’t be passed up. The world is more and more curious, right. (If only I could snap pictures like you do) Thanks for wandering along

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sue / Apr 13 2016 11:39 am

        Snap! Wrong word!!😀😀

        Liked by 1 person

  5. sustainabilitea / Apr 13 2016 1:44 pm

    “It is what is it” is one of my husband’s most repeated phrases. Enjoyed the pairing of fractals and fractured, which is what came to my mind as well.

    janet

    Like

    • philosophermouseofthehedge / Apr 13 2016 2:18 pm

      One of the French Kings (Charles I ?) apparently said that phrase all the time – and now it’s returned to popularity.A realistic phrase.
      Nothing like a fanciful observation of human behavior – we are the circus. Thanks for flying a comment into this fun

      Like

  6. The Hook / Apr 13 2016 3:29 pm

    I miss The Bionic Woman…

    Like

    • philosophermouseofthehedge / Apr 13 2016 3:33 pm

      Who couldn’t?…they may bring her back, but she won’t be Lindsay.
      Thanks for fracturing off a comment (Hope you are feeling better)

      Like

  7. Larissa Thomson / Apr 13 2016 6:53 pm

    Fractals are absolutely amazing! As always, love reading your posts, getting new insights & perspectives. Nice also to see my name in lights!
    I’ll spend the evening looking for and appreciating the patterns in all things. 😊

    Like

    • philosophermouseofthehedge / Apr 14 2016 7:43 am

      Patterns can make things predictable – now if we can just detangle human behavior, maybe the disorderly can be managed? Nice thought. In any case, regular repeats can be beautiful. Thanks for sifting out the idea for me to launch from. Cheers!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Audrey Kalman / Apr 13 2016 9:54 pm

    Wonderfully thought-provoking as usual. I love the idea of human behavior as a fractal.

    Like

    • philosophermouseofthehedge / Apr 14 2016 7:35 am

      There’s got to be a pattern – some understandable explanation for the nutsie-ness…Did you ever wonder as a kid if we watch ants’ at work and play, spraying the mound with water, is there a larger thing doing the same with us? (It sure is raining a lot HA HA) Thanks for crafting a comment to fit into the comment puzzle

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Jane Dougherty / Apr 14 2016 1:24 am

    Oouch! I can’t take this so early in the morning. I’ll come back and reread when I’ve woken up. Where’s the coffee?

    Like

  10. Ally Bean / Apr 14 2016 9:47 am

    Our landscaper, who has a masters degree in public policy of all things, talks about fractals when he’s talking about plants, trees, water features. Anything he’s doing with the land. Oddly enough, that’s where I know this term from. Kind of wacky, huh?

    Like

    • philosophermouseofthehedge / Apr 14 2016 9:59 am

      Fractal fever – they are spread all across nature – and it makes sense for a landscaper (who also has some insight of people from that degree). People find repetition, series, and predictability soothing – even if they don’t recognize it’s there – something/some order felt perhaps. (The coastline fractals seen from the air are fascinating – you never would know from the ground). Bet your landscaper is interesting to talk with. Cool he clued you in. Thanks for planting a comment here

      Liked by 1 person

  11. RKLikesReeses / Apr 22 2016 12:41 pm

    Oooooo…compelling essay! Over and over and over again, people are “strange” and bewildering. All the generations. Love those fractals, btw. Before the most recent two Max OS updates I had 2 different fractal-computing programs on my desktop, used to make images. Soooo beautiful!! But compatibility wasn’t there so the programs are gone. ::sigh:: Thank you for this glimpse at what used to be and what will be again!
    🙂

    Like

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