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November 13, 2015 / philosophermouseofthehedge

Played.

Stars and sky over Easter Island.(Image by: Astrophotographer Brian Hancock. Milky Way over moari near Hanga Roa on Easter Island/Space.com/NASA)

Stoic? Stunned? Fascinated? (Milky Way over Easter Island.(Astrophotographer Brian Hancock/Space.com/NASA)

There are notes played that call deep. From out of no where. To some lost memory of something never experienced.

Songs. In an unrecognizable language. Only remembered by deep past.

Never been there. Never heard it from prime.

But it says, “You do. You did.”

A comfortable recognition.

Yet, unsettling.

Life’s current swirl leaves open some tiny slash and like a hardy plant which forces itself into life despite the inappropriate location, forgotten notes tap into consciousness.

A universal calling.

Music, beat, rhythm, rhyme.

The human species is hard-wired to seek it.

To respond to it.

To accompany the heartbeats, the rhythmic breathing, the blood pulsing.

It all comes down to blood. Bottom line. And top in the head which attempts to give wings in music.

Music, which flies straight back to the source, the heart.

There are notes that call deep.

Why?

Phil, the Philosopher Mouse of the Hedge

 

 

 

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19 Comments

  1. Kate Crimmins / Nov 13 2015 2:01 pm

    I really like music like this. Our local musikfest has an American Indian group that plays with odd instruments (that’s any instrument I can’t name) and makes this kind of sound. So much better than Justin Bieber.

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    • philosophermouseofthehedge / Nov 13 2015 3:15 pm

      This wasn’t the music that started this post. Odd how certain combinations of notes even from places you’ve never been seems to pull. There are Navajo flutes and some from Peru that create similar music. There’s a surprising similarity between flute music and weavings around the world which I find fascinating. Bieber is the total opposite fascinating. Thanks for tuning up a comment

      Liked by 1 person

  2. roughseasinthemed / Nov 13 2015 2:31 pm

    I have so many records (luckily saved from the roof leak) yet I rarely listen to them. Too deep, too emotional. Sometimes the peace and quiet are nicer. Most times these days.

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    • philosophermouseofthehedge / Nov 13 2015 3:24 pm

      It’s easy to get lost in music and lose track of time. Grabbed a few of my dad’s old ones which are on a book shelf hopefully being protected there. (Hurricanes bring up such waverings among priorities.)
      More and more flipping as much noise off as possible. Mental clutter. I’m thinking Chilean Atacama Desert/astronomy installation. As Spaniard Jesús Mosterín said, “the only time in history that windows into the universe are being thrown wide open.” http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/08/world/americas/high-in-chilean-desert-a-huge-astronomy-project.html?_r=0
      Thanks for hearing the music

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      • roughseasinthemed / Nov 13 2015 3:37 pm

        Fascinating read. Who knows what they will find. If … anything. On a much more simplistic note, I read a tat novel, where the hero invited the heroine to listen to the desert music. Now that did sound nice.

        Liked by 1 person

        • philosophermouseofthehedge / Nov 13 2015 3:44 pm

          It sounds as good as the Emerald City of Oz. Not a real desert person, but in Arizona and New Mexico you can hear the desert music – it was/is a popular thing to do. Simple and quiet is good.
          Now Chile has the water just over the mountains – stars, mountains, water…perfect..if I can just get past the nose bleeds. Mt. altitudes never been too much of an issue – and for that night view…I can pack tissues.

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  3. Carrie Rubin / Nov 13 2015 4:49 pm

    Music can transport us like nothing else, even more so than reading since music is often so visceral. The Celtic music clip is lovely.

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    • philosophermouseofthehedge / Nov 13 2015 5:46 pm

      Confess that I did terrible in music classes in college. Once music starts I just get lost in day dreams and stories. Celtic and bagpipe music usually play when I’m seriously writing…better than barking dog. Thanks for slipping along with a comment

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Robin King / Nov 13 2015 7:51 pm

    Lovely, soulful — marvelous in every way! 🎶

    Like

  5. PiedType / Nov 14 2015 6:00 pm

    Music is magic. I don’t know how else to explain it. Everyone is moved by some of it, and some of it moves everyone.

    Liked by 1 person

    • philosophermouseofthehedge / Nov 14 2015 6:41 pm

      Experts from the ancient Greeks to creators of the infamous “Boy Bands” have analyzed and calculated which notes and combinations appeal to humans. It is very strange…something’s calling home…
      Thanks for joining the comment chorus

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  6. Littlesundog / Nov 15 2015 5:22 am

    Living here in a Native American community, we often hear the beat of drums and tribal singing down in the park (just a few blocks away). Today as I walked to the river I heard music from a pow wow dance in the park. It’s indescribable how much I felt a part of the earth and sky.

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    • philosophermouseofthehedge / Nov 15 2015 9:29 pm

      What it fascinating to me is certain people have an inexplicable response/connection to certain music – from places they have never been or music they were never exposed to before. Some say this is a connection to a universal mind/consciousness- a universal memory, some say it is signs of reincarnation and memories of former lives, other say it is the particular notes/vibrations that appeals to an individual’s own particular vibrations and unheard sounds inside the body. Some say it is nature calling…Music soothes the savage beast? In any case, music affects people – even the deaf who feel it. No wonder music of some sort/chants/instruments have presence in almost all religions. Humans think they are so intelligent, but music’s call is baffles yet compels. You are so lucky to be near such spirits and celebrations. Thanks for gathering up a comment to leave

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  7. marthaschaefer / Nov 16 2015 1:18 am

    A ‘soundtrack” exists for each of us, the key is to stop and hear it. Well done, Phil.

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    • philosophermouseofthehedge / Nov 16 2015 3:17 pm

      People wonder why life is so frantic and people so stressed, perhaps it’s because no longer are there time/a day where it all stops and people can breath – then hear. Civilization seems to have taken a busy wrong turn to the point of some not being able to tolerate quiet. Machines given waaaay too much power over humans right now. Thanks for the astute comment

      Liked by 1 person

  8. jannatwrites / Nov 23 2015 3:17 pm

    Music is beautiful, whether instrumental or nature’s song. There’s a certain peace to be found when we get outside ourselves and allow ourselves to be immersed in it.

    Like

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